Man holding camera in front of tree

Announcing the Climatelinks 2020 Photo Contest

By Climatelinks

Do you have great photos of climate and development? Do you want to promote your work on Climatelinks? Now is your chance!

Submit your photos so we can share your work or your organization’s work with our global community of climate practitioners.

Our 2020 Photo Contest theme is Healthy Forests for a Healthy Future. We’re looking to capture nature-based solutions such as active reforestation, plantations, agroforestry, and natural regeneration. We would also like photos that tell the story of how individuals and communities interact with the forests they depend on, and how local leaders are conserving, managing, and restoring them.

You may submit up to five images complying with the contest rules and requirements. Entries will be judged on relevance, composition, originality, and technical quality. Winners will be selected overall through an evaluation panel composed of USAID staff and the Climatelinks team.

The contest runs until July 31, 2020. Winning photos will be announced in Fall 2020, subsequently featured in Climatelinks communications, highlighted on the website’s topic pages, and showcased in Climatelinks photo gallery. The winning photos will also be featured in the Office of Global Climate Change’s official 2021 calendar, which will be distributed to contest winners.

Sectors
Health
Strategic Objective
Integration
Topics
Adaptation, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change Integration, Gender and Social Inclusion, Health, Resilience, Self-Reliance, Sustainable Landscapes
Region
Global

Climatelinks

 

Climatelinks is a global knowledge portal for USAID staff, implementing partners, and the broader community working at the intersection of climate change and international development. The portal curates and archives technical guidance and knowledge related to USAID’s work to help countries mitigate and adapt to climate change. 

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