The application for the Climate Strategies Accelerator (CSA) fellowship is now open. 

The CSA is both a fund –– with $20 million and counting ready to invest in new climate solutions –– and an accelerator, staffed with experts who know how to get big, audacious ideas off the ground. Now in its second year, the Climate Strategies Accelerator is currently searching for 8-10 leaders (from any continent) with ideas for ending our dependence on oil. They’re looking for social, cultural, and political solutions that reimagine transit systems, water use, land rights, financial markets, consumer behavior, and more –– any idea that stands to dramatically cut oil use.

 
Once selected, leaders will join the Oil Breakthrough Lab, a week-long boot camp and intensive 90-day accelerator designed to refine and strengthen their visions. Over the course of the lab, leaders will receive mentorship from experts; exposure to a global network of funders, luminaries, and seasoned innovators; and (most importantly) dedicated working time. Participants will come out of the lab with a polished proposal and pitch, which they’ll present to the CSA network of funders at a collaborative, in-person event. The CSA Fund will then decide if any of the candidates will move on to become Program Leaders, receiving grants of up to $1-2 million per year over a three-year period to further pursue their ideas.

The CSA application is due January 31, 2017. For more information on the opportunity and to apply for the fellowship, please visit https://www.climatestrategiesaccelerator.org/

Strategic Objective
Mitigation
Topics
Water and Sanitation, Transportation, Sustainable Landscapes, Mitigation, Land Use, Climate Finance, Clean Energy
Region
Global

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