Introducing the Newest Member of the Links Family: BiodiversityLinks

By Climatelinks

BiodiversityLinks, USAID’s newly refreshed and relaunched knowledge portal for biodiversity conservation, features key USAID tools and resources, as well as new evidence and learning.

Many long-time users likely remember BiodiversityLinks’ predecessors, the Natural Resources Management and Development (RM) Portal and the Biodiversity Conservation Gateway. BiodiversityLinks takes the best of these sites forward into a platform that fuels learning to improve biodiversity programming.

The site features a redesigned homepage and updated navigation throughout. Climatelinks users are now able to explore biodiversity’s interactions and cross-sector benefits with Climate and other sectors. You can discover cross-sectoral integration and adaptive management resources separated by topic and take advantage of new Library functionality to more easily share curated resources with colleagues and partners. 

Enjoy exploring the new site, and please contribute your resources, learning, and stories related to biodiversity! We will continue adding resources and adapting the site based on your feedback so please reach out to the site managers with any submissions, thoughts, or questions so we can address them and better meet your needs.

Strategic Objective
Adaptation, Integration, Mitigation
Topics
Adaptation, Ecosystem-based Adaptation, Biodiversity, Climate Change Integration, Climate Policy, Conflict and Governance, Food Security and Agriculture, Health, Sustainable Land Management, Mitigation, Monitoring and Evaluation, Natural Resource Management, Partnership, Resilience, Self-Reliance
Region
Global

Climatelinks

 

Climatelinks is a global knowledge portal for USAID staff, implementing partners, and the broader community working at the intersection of climate change and international development. The portal curates and archives technical guidance and knowledge related to USAID’s work to help countries mitigate and adapt to climate change. 

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