Sustainable charcoal

Postcard from the Field: Sustainable Charcoal in Mampu, Democratic Republic of the Congo

By Climatelinks

Stacks of sustainable charcoal produced at Mampu cooperative site outside of Kinshasa visited as part of a scoping mission looking at alternative local species to integrate into agroforestry woodfuel systems to increase the volume of sustainable charcoal supply for urban areas in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, carried out by the U.S. Forest Service International Programs and supported by USAID’s Africa Bureau in July 2018. Charcoal is the main source of cooking fuel in the the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and an increasing urban demand for it is resulting in forest degradation and deforestation.

Postcards from the field features submissions to the Climatelinks photo gallery. This photo was submitted to the “Planning a food-secure future” category of the 2019 Climatelinks photo contest. The Climatelinks community is encouraged to submit new photos to the gallery through this submission form.

Sectors
Urban
Topics
Climate-Smart Agriculture, Forestry, Health, Natural Resource Management, Urban
Region
Africa

Climatelinks

 

Climatelinks is a global knowledge portal for USAID staff, implementing partners, and the broader community working at the intersection of climate change and international development. The portal curates and archives technical guidance and knowledge related to USAID’s work to help countries mitigate and adapt to climate change. 

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