Haitians show off drought-resistant, high-yield varieties of cassava.

Registration open for USAID's Land Tenure and Property Rights MOOC

USAID's Land Tenure and Property Rights Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) offers an intensive study track on land, resource tenure, and the environment.

 
Rights to land and resources are at the center of our most pressing development issues: poverty reduction, food security, conflict, urbanization, gender equality, climate change, and resilience. Secure Land Tenure and Property Rights (LTPR) create incentives for investment, broad-based economic growth, and good stewardship of natural resources. Insecure property rights and weak land governance systems often provoke conflict and instability, which can trap communities, countries, and entire regions in a cycle of poverty.
 
This year’s course runs from January 23 - May 31, 2017 and will examine the issues, theories, evidence, and best practices around land tenure, property rights, and international development programming. This course features interactive discussions, lectures, and case studies from a wide variety of experts in the field.
Learn more about the course and register here
Strategic Objective
Mitigation, Adaptation
Topics
Training, Sustainable Landscapes, Resilience, Land Use, Land Tenure, Gender and Social Inclusion, Conflict and Governance, Adaptation
Region
Global

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