Bangladesh

At a Glance

With two-thirds of the country less than 20 feet above sea level and with rapidly growing urban centers, Bangladesh is highly threatened by climate change. Resources listed below summarize existing information on climate change impacts, greenhouse gas emissions and USAID climate and development programs in Bangladesh. USAID staff and other development practitioners may find this information useful for climate risk management and for considering the linkages between climate change and development.

    Climate Projections and Impacts

    Refer to the Climate Risk Profile (2018) for more information

    Climate Projections

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    Increase in Rainfall Intensity, Flood Incidence, and Cyclone Intensity & Incidence

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    Rising Sea Levels and Increased Incidence of Storm Surge

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    Increased Temperature

    Key Climate Impact Areas

    Agriculture and Food Security

    Ecosystems

    Energy

    Human Health

    Water Resources

    Funding and Key Indicators

    Refer to metadata and sources for more details.


    USAID Climate Change Funding (2020)

    Total

    $11.415 Million

    Adaptation

    $6.5 Million

    Clean Energy

    $1.415 Million

    Sustainable Landscapes

    $3.5 Million

    GAIN Vulnerability

    Medium

    Population (2020)

    162.7 million

    GHG Emissions Growth

    2.49%

    % Forested Area

    11%

    Climate Change Information

    Bangladesh Photo Gallery

    Stories from the Area

    As one of the most densely populated countries in the world, Bangladesh understands how critical a reliable energy supply is to the country's growth. However, Bangladesh is currently dependent on a waning natural gas supply and has reached a point where it must evaluate energy independent paths that are sustainable, cost-effective, and ensure long-term domestic energy supply. 
    This blog series features interviews with the winners of the 2020 Climatelinks Photo Contest. This photo, submitted by Moniruzzaman Sazal, is available on the Climatelinks Photo Gallery.
    Women are the primary custodians of natural resources in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region and are at the forefront of the impacts of climate change. Yet, when it comes to decision-making and research on managing these resources, women’s voices are rarely heard.