Lake with surrounding forest

Peru

At a Glance

The South America Regional Mission Environmental Program serves Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru.

Peru is one of the most biodiverse countries in the world, with rich marine coastal, Andean highlands and Amazonian ecosystems, but this diversity is at risk due to changes in temperature and precipitation. Peru is susceptible to natural disasters including floods, droughts, and landslides, whose frequency, severity, and impacts are compounded by the El Niño Southern Oscillation and will be amplified by increased climate change and variability. Combined with ongoing problems such as agricultural expansion, deforestation, illegal mining, and air and water pollution, these climate risks threaten recent advancements in Peru’s development. The land-use change and forestry sector contribute around half of the country’s overall greenhouse gas emissions, followed by energy and agriculture.

    Climate Projections and Impacts

    Refer to the Climate Risk Profile (2017).

    Climate Projections

    Image

    Drought icon

    Increased Drought Frequency

    Image

    Sea Level Rise

    Image

    Increased Temperature

    Key Climate Impact Areas

    Agriculture

    Ecosystems

    Infrastructure

    Human Health

    Water

    Funding and Key Indicators

    Refer to metadata and sources for more details.


    USAID Regional Climate Change Funding (2020)

    Total

    $9 Million

    Adaptation

    $3 Million

    Sustainable Landscapes

    $6 Million

    GAIN Vulnerability

    Medium

    Population (2020)

    31.9 Million

    Glacier-Dependent

    Yes

    GHG Emissions Growth

    1.45%

    % Forested Area

    57.7%

    Climate Change Information

    Peru Photo Gallery

    Stories from the Area

    When the Incan ruins of Machu Picchu were threatened by forest fires last September, firefighter Jessica Morón and her wildland firefighting team battled the flames to protect the historic sanctuary and its surrounding biodiversity.
    This blog series features interviews with the winners of the 2020 Climatelinks Photo Contest. This photo, submitted on behalf of Peru’s USAID Pro-Bosques Activity, is available on the Climatelinks Photo Gallery.
    Perú es el cuarto país con el mayor volumen de turba tropical, cuya mayor parte se encuentra relativamente menos degradada en comparación con otras regiones del mundo. Sin embargo, esto podría cambiar. La creciente presión del desarrollo y la carencia de políticas específicas de protección ponen en riesgo a las turberas de Perú y sus reservas de carbono.