Excavator in East Africa

Photo Category: 
Photo Upload: 
Excavator in Kenya
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Credit: Eric Onyiego/ USAID Kenya
Photo Story: 
Excavator in Kenya
Photo Country: 
Kenya

Runway

Photo Category: 
Photo Upload: 
A cargo plane carrying USAID relief supplies for families affected by Hurricane Irma arrived in Antigua on September 14, 2017.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Credit: Peter Schecter, USAID/OFDA
Photo Story: 
A cargo plane carrying USAID relief supplies for families affected by Hurricane Irma arrived in Antigua on September 14, 2017.
Photo Country: 
Antigua and Barbuda

Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement

Photo Category: 
Photo Upload: 
An aerial view of a section of Kakuma Refugee Camp.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Credit: Mwangi Kirubi/USAID
Photo Story: 
Development of the new Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement near Kakuma Camp in Turkana County An aerial view of a section of Kakuma Refugee Camp. Kenya is home to 500,000 refugees, the majority fleeing conflict in Somalia and South Sudan. Kenya hosts the second largest refugee population in Africa, after Ethiopia. In Kenya, refugees live in two camps—Kakuma and Dadaab—with restricted movement and are not allowed to work outside the camps. Dadaab and Kakuma are located in the remote, arid regions of northern Kenya. USAID, through the Office of Food for Peace (FFP) provides in-kind food assistance to the World Food Program (WFP) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) for distribution in the camps. Refugees receive a general food ration, which consists of cereals, pulses, vegetable oil, salt and a nutrient-enriched flour. Rations are distributed by World Vision, WFP’s food distribution partner. Almost all refugees rely solely on WFP’s food for survival. In FY 16, FFP contributed $30.5 million to WFP and UNICEF ($1.5 million) for in-kind food and nutrition assistance to the refugee program. Due to the congestion of the Kakuma refugee camp, an additional camp known as the Kalobeyei Integrated Refugee Settlement, was being developed approximately 25km north of Kakuma. The plan for Kalobeyei was that it was not to be another refugee camp, but a settlement that was to encourage integration between the refugees and host communities for the mutual economic benefit of both groups.
Photo Country: 
Kenya

Coffee, better for people and planet

Photo Upload: 
Green coffee beans and white coffee flowers are seen close-up on the stem of a plant.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Graciela Zavala Segreste Rainforest Alliance Mexico
Photo Story: 

Place: Oaxaca
2019

Project: The Alliance for Sustainable Landscapes and Markets

The alliance for sustainable landscapes and markets integrates communities, producers, markets and consumers, in order to make impactful changes that attend environmental and social issues.

We link sustainable producers with responsible markets that care about bringing to the final consumer quality products that don’t deforest or degrade forests, generating the capture and storage of CO2 and improving the livelihoods of the forest’s inhabitants in Mexico.

We are working with coffee producers in Oaxaca and Chiapas to strengthen their capacities in climate smart agriculture. Also we are working to increase their profitability and the competitiveness in the market by strengthening the producers entrepreneurial capacities, promoting the inclusion of women and young generations in the value chains.

Photo Country: 
Mexico

Working together to be prepared for natural disasters

Photo Upload: 
In the foreground, two women sit talking and laughing. A sign behind says 'Chuuk State Disaster Tabletop Exercise.'
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Harut Sarian
Photo Story: 

The Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall Islands are vulnerable to typhoons, floods, droughts and tsunamis. The Enhanced Preparedness for Effective Response (EPER) program, funded by USAID, supports FSM and RMI’s resilience through capacity development and local ownership in disaster risk reduction and disaster risk management.

As part of this program, IOM designed tabletop exercises to test and improve the capacity of stakeholders to prepare for and respond to disasters. In this photo, two members of the Disaster Coordination Office participate in a tabletop exercise hosted by Chuuk State in Weno between the 16th and 18th of July 2019. The photo was taken by IOM’s Lee Arkhie Perez on the first day of the activity.

Photo Country: 
Micronesia

Maasai man with fire

Photo Category: 
Photo Upload: 
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Patrick Nease
Photo Story: 

July 2019. Near Makuyuni, Tanzania, a Maasai man starts a fire from the friction created by rubbing two sticks together– a traditional method that has kept the pastoralist Maasai people warm and well-fed for several centuries. As climate change threatens the Serengeti ecosystem that nourishes their cattle, so too is their rangeland decreasing from increased agriculture, wildlife preserves, and stricter land rights.

The growing number of tourists and a waning nomadic lifestyle for many Maasai people presents an opportunity to share perspectives in a rapidly evolving world. Tourists are likely to learn about the threats to Maasai culture as they interact with them on their way to nearby national parks. While the future of the Maasai is uncertain, the ability for them to tell their story is stronger than ever. Sharing skills like fire making allows tourists to have more than just a window to others' lives; understanding similarities to Maasai families enables them to connect the dots on the collective fabric that defines us as we adapt to a changing climate.

Photo Country: 
Tanzania

Building embankments to increase resilience to climate change

Photo Upload: 
Man and other community members use discarded oyster shells, sand bags, and stakes to build embankments along the coast.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
West Africa Biodiversity and Climate Change
Photo Story: 

Sea level rise and accompanying coastal flooding is proving to be a major risk to the lives and livelihoods of the people of coastal Sierra Leone, including this Momaya community. Now, community members are using discarded oyster shells, sand, and stakes to build embankments that will protect their property from coastal erosion.

Photo Country: 
Sierra Leone

Using rice-mangrove integration to increase food security

Photo Upload: 
A person stands in a muddy area, planting young mangrove trees.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Edudzi Nyomi
Photo Story: 

Many farmers in coastal Sierra Leone cultivate rice as their staple food. In doing that, they clear land including mangrove forests to make way for their rice farms. Unfortunately, this has a counterproductive effect as the water during high tides overwhelms the rice farms and destroys these crops. WA BiCC introduced this new approach called "rice-mangrove integration" where mangrove plants are replanted around the rice farms to protect the rice crops from overwhelming amounts of water. These mangrove forests also serve as spawning grounds for fish, oysters, and other aquatic species, increasing food security in these communities, including Bonthe in coastal Sierra Leone.

Photo Country: 
Sierra Leone

Bench terraces and agroforestry trees in Nyabihu hillsides, Western Rwanda

Photo Upload: 
A step mountainside is seen from a ridge, with multiple terraces cascading down the side from top to bottom.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
David Kinyua
Photo Story: 

Western parts of Rwanda has very steep hill sides prone to soil erosion and severe soil degradation. Climate Change is expected to result in increase in extreme events is likely to affect the heavily populated, denuded, steep hillsides much more than other areas. A Feed the Future project called Hinga Weze is promoting radical terracing and planting Agroforestry trees to were planted to provide wood for fuel and fodder for livestock/social protection while avoiding deforestation and improving food security. This has multiple additional benefits, namely reduced soil erosion and increased resilience to heavy rains through improved slope stability; water management and nutrient recycling which improve agricultural production and carbon sequestration.

Photo Country: 
Rwanda

Climate resilience in action

Photo Upload: 
A group of people gather around the bottom of a weather station located on the slopes of a mountain.
Attribution Copyright: 
Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
IWMI Nepal
Photo Story: 

IWMI and DSCWM staff inspecting a meteorological station built in Shikharpur Baitadi, Nepal in 2017. The station will provide data to better plan and develop climate change mitigation technologies in the countries most vulnerable regions and communities. Building Climate Resilience of Watersheds in Mountain Eco-Regions (BCRWME) is the first component of Strategic Program for Climate Resilience (SPCR) of Nepal. The project is carried out by IWMI, along with ADB, the Nordic Development Fund, and the Department of DSWCM.

Photo Country: 
Nepal