Malaria Smart School

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Learning about Malaria
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Caitlin Christman, USAID
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Ayaturn Admani, 12, stands with his science teacher, Muransa Moses, in front of the Malaria Corner in his Primary Year 4 classroom.
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Uganda

Malaria Launch in Apac District, Uganda

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Spraying Activity
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Helen Manson/USAID
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Malaria Launch in Apac District, Uganda Since 2012, USAID's Indoor Residual Spraying activity has protected almost 7 million Ugandans from malaria, and contributed to reducing malaria infection rates in targeted districts by 55 percent.
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Uganda

USAID in Zambia

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Maternal Waiting Home, Nkhanga Rural Health Centre.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Amy Fowler/USAID
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USAID in Zambia Saving Mothers, Giving Life, Maternal Waiting Home, Nkhanga Rural Health Centre.
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Zambia

Teaching girls about nutrition and good hygiene

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Teaching Girls about nutrition and good hygiend.jpg
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Khandker Islam
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SYLLA DIONGTO, SENEGAL - JANUARY 15, 2015 Community-based solution provider Hapsatou Ka runs a young volunteer group to teach critical nutrition and hygiene practices to mothers-to-be. Trained by the nutrition program USAID Yaajeende, Hapsatou is now sharing her knowledge, giving 11- to 12-year-old girls the information they need to eventually live productive lives and raise healthy children. In Senegal, where 17 percent of children under 5 are underweight, these efforts are making communities healthier, smarter and stronger. “Our next generation will be in much better health because they will know better how they should eat,” Hapsatou says. “When you eat something that is clean, good and rich, you will have a good, healthy life.” Find the full story on USAID’s new storytelling hub: go.usa.gov/3fpUY
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Senegal

USAID Thailand

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Training on Standardized and Harmonized Surveillance Methods for Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in Food Animals in Southeast Asia
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Richard Nyberg, USAID
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Training on Standardized and Harmonized Surveillance Methods for Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) in Food Animals in Southeast Asia
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Thailand

Water monitor volunteers learn how to assess stream health

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Four people holding tools walk along a hillside in front of a mountainous background.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Patrick Nease
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October 2016, Conservation South Africa's (CSA) Nolubabalo Kwayimani teaches volunteers to perform a stream assessment in order to determine changes and improvements in stream health in the uMzimvubu watershed. The uMzimvubu catchment spans over two million hectares of the poorest rural areas of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. This critical ecosystem provides water to approximately one million people and supports more than 2,000 plant and animal species that are unique to this area. The catchment is presently under threat due to the degradation of land from overgrazing, the loss of land to water-thirsty invasive vegetation, and vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Rural communities also face significant challenges: unemployment is higher than the national average, with many people dependent upon social grants and the landscape for their livelihoods. The proportion of households with access to piped water inside the home or yard is as low as 16 percent, and waterborne diseases pose a risk to youth and the elderly. In order for conservation to be effectively implemented, the health needs of the community and the proper management of their livestock need to be addressed.

CSA is working in the upper reaches of the uMzimvubu to improve water resources sustainability by applying a “One Health” framework that integrates water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) activities with freshwater conservation, improved livestock farming and restoration efforts. By empowering local communities to manage and benefit from their natural resources, and supporting local governance structures that enable sustainable livelihoods, “One Health” aims secure water futures for all water users. This project draws on work from the USAID-supported Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group—a consortium of seven international conservation NGOs—to develop project implementation guidelines and a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework and indicators to measure the added value of integrated freshwater conservation and WASH programming. CSA’s “One Health” initiative in the uMzimvubu catchment is demonstrating how human well-being, economic growth, and environmental sustainability go hand in hand.

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South Africa

Determining changes in stream health

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Four people kneel and look closely at a dish with stream water inside.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Patrick Nease
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October 2016, Conservation South Africa's (CSA) Nolubabalo Kwayimani and Nompendulo "Pesh" Mgwali teach volunteers to perform a stream assessment in order to determine changes and improvements in stream health in the uMzimvubu watershed. The uMzimvubu catchment spans over two million hectares of the poorest rural areas of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. This critical ecosystem provides water to approximately one million people and supports more than 2,000 plant and animal species that are unique to this area. The catchment is presently under threat due to the degradation of land from overgrazing, the loss of land to water-thirsty invasive vegetation, and vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Rural communities also face significant challenges: unemployment is higher than the national average, with many people dependent upon social grants and the landscape for their livelihoods. The proportion of households with access to piped water inside the home or yard is as low as 16 percent, and waterborne diseases pose a risk to youth and the elderly. In order for conservation to be effectively implemented, the health needs of the community and the proper management of their livestock need to be addressed.

CSA is working in the upper reaches of the uMzimvubu to improve water resources sustainability by applying a “One Health” framework that integrates water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) activities with freshwater conservation, improved livestock farming and restoration efforts. By empowering local communities to manage and benefit from their natural resources, and supporting local governance structures that enable sustainable livelihoods, “One Health” aims secure water futures for all water users. This project draws on work from the USAID-supported Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group—a consortium of seven international conservation NGOs—to develop project implementation guidelines and a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework and indicators to measure the added value of integrated freshwater conservation and WASH programming. CSA’s “One Health” initiative in the uMzimvubu catchment is demonstrating how human well-being, economic growth, and environmental sustainability go hand in hand.

Photo Country: 
South Africa

Protecting children from climate risks

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Small girl sitting on sandy ground and looking at the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Eric Hyman
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Children are often most vulnerable to climate impacts. Parents and their children may face increasing risks over time. These impacts include extreme weather events and climate-related malnutrition, increases in the prevalence of malaria and other diseases, water and sanitation problems, and air pollution.

Inhaca Island, Mozambique. October 31, 2014.

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Mozambique

USAID in Madagascar: Malaria control – bed net continuous distribution launch

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Woman in Madagascar takes a folded mosquito net from a health care worker.
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Copyright © 2019
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USAID/Madagascar
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A continuous distribution launch of insecticide treated bed nets was held in the district of Vavatenina on December 8, 2016. During the campaign, 650,000 bed nets will be distributed across eight eastern, high-transmission districts of Madagascar. The campaign is conducted to ensure families have continuous access to bed nets, accounting for new sleeping spaces resulting from births, marriages and migrations.

Photo: Health, Population and Nutrition Office Director Daniele Nyirandutiye provides a new bed net to a young mother.

Photo Country: 
Madagascar

Using improved pest management systems to combat crop pests and diseases

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Two men wearing masks spray pesticide on to terraced crops of potato plants.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Herve Irankuda
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This picture was taken by Herve Irankunda for Feed the Future Rwanda Hinga Weze Activity on September 9, 2019, in Ngororero District in Eastern Rwanda. It features two beneficiaries of Hinga Weze, a five-year $32.6 million USAID-funded project (2017-2022) that aims to sustainably increase smallholder farmers’ income, improve the nutritional status of women and children, and increase the resilience of Rwanda’s agricultural and food systems to a changing climate. Hinga Weze works to empower over 530,000 smallholder farmers across 10 districts.

These men were pictured using pesticide on their plot of Irish potatoes on a terraced hillside. Hinga Weze is supporting use improved pest management in order to control crop pests and also to construct terraces on 2,000 hectares of land order to control soil erosion especially around the hilly parts of Rwanda. The farmers including women are able to gain and control incomes from the improved yields, and therefore reserving enough for their households to improve nutritional intake.

Photo Country: 
Rwanda