Improving Livelihoods through Agro-preneurship

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In photo: Joshua Okundi in Homa Bay County demonstrates usage of a solar pump.
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Copyright © 2019
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Photo credit: Irene Angwenyi / USAID Kenya
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Improving Livelihoods through Agro-preneurship Tissue culture banana, an innovative idea and technology is turning around subsistence farming of an inconsequential crop to a lucrative agribusiness venture for Joshua Okundi. A smallholder farmer in Homa Bay County, Joshua, aged 57 earns KES 430,000 from tissue culture bananas planted in a one acre piece of land. "Besides the income I from the bananas, I also plant staples and horticulture crops, and rear fish in a pond to supplement nutritional needs in my home and for sale," said Joshua Okundi. In photo: Joshua Okundi in Homa Bay County demonstrates usage of a solar pump.
Photo Country: 
Nepal

Cutting Grass for her Animals

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Cutting Grass for her Animals Nagele Boru cuts grass from a community enclosure to feed her calves.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Kelley Lynch
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Cutting Grass for her Animals Nagele Boru cuts grass from a community enclosure to feed her calves. She and her husband worked on the enclosure as part of the Productive Safety Net Program (PSNP), a large-scale, Government of Ethiopia-implemented, multi-donor-funded program that aims to help people escape food insecurity in Ethiopia. Funding more than 20 percent of PSNP’s budget between 2010 and 2014, USAID was the program’s largest bilateral donor. This program helped to cushion vulnerable groups from shocks and increase their resilience by providing predictable and timely food transfers while they work to build community assets and enhance their livelihoods. Nationwide, the PSNP reached 6.4 million people, 1.5 million of them through USAID support. In pastoral areas, USAID’s PSNP programs supported 162,728 people in the Somali Region and the Borena Zone of the Oromia Region. Working with the Ethiopian Government, other donors and implementing partners, USAID is also helping design the next generation of PSNP programs through developing more sustainable approaches to protecting and building household and community assets for people in pastoral areas. PSNP public works reduce communities’ risks and improve resilience through a wide range of activities, including fodder production, infrastructure construction, soil and water
Photo Country: 
Ethiopia

Livestock on the way to market

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Livestock on the way to market A man looks after cattle. Near Mekele, Tigray, Ethiopia.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Kelley Lynch
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Livestock on the way to market A man looks after cattle. Near Mekele, Tigray, Ethiopia.

Photo Country: 
Ethiopia

Niger Community garden

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Community Garden
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Mercy Corps
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Pictured is the community garden that Mercy Corps helped the women start in their village this year. It’s the first garden they’ve ever managed, and they hope to extend it next year with a drip irrigation system that Mercy Corps plans to build. They’re growing a wide variety of vegetables like tomatoes, lettuce, cabbage and potatoes, which they use to feed their families and also sell for some additional income.
Photo Country: 
Niger

Food Security in Malawi

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Two men sit in front of a stack of large grain bags, grinning at the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Kady Chiu/USAID
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Food Security Through partnerships with the Government of Malawi and local non-governmental organizations, USAID is spearheading innovative programs to strengthen smallholder farmers’ economic and climatic resiliency.
Photo Country: 
Malawi

AOM Mango Processing Plant

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AOM Mango Processing Plant - Mali/ Value Chains
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: USAID West Africa Trade Hub
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AOM Mango Processing Plant - Mali/ Value Chains
Photo Country: 
Mali

Coffee, better for people and planet

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Green coffee beans and white coffee flowers are seen close-up on the stem of a plant.
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Copyright © 2019
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Graciela Zavala Segreste Rainforest Alliance Mexico
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Place: Oaxaca
2019

Project: The Alliance for Sustainable Landscapes and Markets

The alliance for sustainable landscapes and markets integrates communities, producers, markets and consumers, in order to make impactful changes that attend environmental and social issues.

We link sustainable producers with responsible markets that care about bringing to the final consumer quality products that don’t deforest or degrade forests, generating the capture and storage of CO2 and improving the livelihoods of the forest’s inhabitants in Mexico.

We are working with coffee producers in Oaxaca and Chiapas to strengthen their capacities in climate smart agriculture. Also we are working to increase their profitability and the competitiveness in the market by strengthening the producers entrepreneurial capacities, promoting the inclusion of women and young generations in the value chains.

Photo Country: 
Mexico

Bananas and coffee! Diversification of crops for a better future

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A group of people stand among coffee and banana plants, and two of the people hold bunches of bananas up for the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Graciela Zavala Segreste Rainforest Alliance Mexico
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Monte Sinai, Chiapas, 2019.
Project: The Alliance for Sustainable Landscapes and Markets

Within the framework of the “Alliance for Sustainable Landscapes and Markets” financed by USAID and implemented by Rainforest Alliance in Mexico we strengthen resilient, sustainable farm and forestland management of coffee producers in Chiapas.

The diversification of crops in coffee landscapes is essential to transform agricultural practices towards a more sustainable future. Not only do fruit trees in coffee crops give shadow, protection and nurture to coffee plants, making them more resilient to funguses and diseases but they also help in the food security of rural communities and in the sustainability of coffee in Mexico.

In Alliance with Olam, we are working with 200 coffee producers in the restoration of their landscapes. We are restoring and reforesting 1, 000 degraded hectares of coffee crops that were devastated by the coffee rust commonly called “Roya” in Mexico.

Photo Country: 
Mexico

Planting the roots for sustainable fisheries management and women's empowerment

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A woman in a bright orange lifejacket looks into the distance.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Jamie Wen-Besson
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Densu Estuary, Ghana. September 10, 2019. A member of the Densu Oyster Pickers Association (DOPA) looks at some of the 20,000 mangrove seedlings her women's association has planted during a boat trip to monitor oyster habitat conditions. On the Densu Delta, overharvesting, a new dam that reduces salinity in the water and mangrove degradation have contributed to declining oyster populations. USAID's Advancing Gender in the Environment (AGENT) partnership with the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) is supporting work in Ghana, Indonesia, and the Philippines to address women's empowerment, access to finance, and sustainable fisheries management. Here, IUCN hears from the women of DOPA, supported by USAID's Sustainable Fisheries Management Program (SFMP) in Ghana, during a field mission in innovating and implementing ecosystem approaches to fisheries management, which includes repopulating important oyster habitats: mangroves.

Photo Country: 
Ghana

Women and men working together planting rice near Antsirabe, Madagascar

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A line of people spread out along a ride paddy, bending down to plant seedlings.
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Copyright © 2019
Photo Credit: 
Eric Hyman
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Paddy rice transplanting is a laborious task. In some countries, women bear the bulk of this back-stressing work. However, in this area of Madagascar, women and men work together in transplanting rice seedlings. Another interesting feature of rice planting in this area is the cooperation of neighbors in planting individually owned plots.

November 30, 2018

Photo Country: 
Madagascar