Donkeys Transport Water

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Women work together to tie jerry cans full of water onto a donkey. Rurujis, Somali Region, Ethiopia.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Kelley Lynch
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Donkeys Transport Water.  Women work together to tie jerry cans full of water onto a donkey. Rurujis, Somali Region, Ethiopia.
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Ethiopia

Access to clean water helps school children stay healthy

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Access to clean water helps school children stay healthy
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Eric Onyiego/USAID Kenya
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Ibinda primary school pupils in Kakamega County draw clean water from a well. Clean water enhances hygiene among school children while also keeping them in school.
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Kenya

Improved WASH in Ghana

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a primary school pupils in Kakamega County draw clean water from a well.
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Water and Development Alliance
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Improved WASH in Ghana This project improved water access to six beneficiary communities through decentralized water treatment kiosks and improved sanitation facilities and hygiene behaviors for schools in those communities. Over 5,000 students and teachers with improved water and sanitation access at school. Over 1,000 people with household water access 6 schools measurably impacted by project activities. 60,000 people were reached with limited water access through the kiosks.
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Ghana

Access to Water Resources Reducing Conflict among Communities

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Access to Water Resources Reducing Conflict among Communities
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Copyright © 2019
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Credit: Eric Onyiego/USAID Kenya
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Women and children are most burdened by conflicts arising from scarcity of water resources. By protecting Alakara Shallow Well in Isiolo County, USAID ensured availability of water for communities and their livestock thereby reducing conflict and enhancing peaceful co-existence among communities living in Isiolo County.
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Kenya

Amuna, Peru

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A water canal runs along a mountainside, from the background directly to the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
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USAID/Peru
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The amuna is part of a traditional water conservation system that captures and channels rainwater during the rainy season to recharge aquifers, increasing the availability of water during the dry season. The ecosystem-based adaptation/green infrastructure project in Peru is restoring these structures, some of which are 1,500 years old.
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Peru

Water monitor volunteers learn how to assess stream health

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Four people holding tools walk along a hillside in front of a mountainous background.
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Copyright © 2019
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Patrick Nease
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October 2016, Conservation South Africa's (CSA) Nolubabalo Kwayimani teaches volunteers to perform a stream assessment in order to determine changes and improvements in stream health in the uMzimvubu watershed. The uMzimvubu catchment spans over two million hectares of the poorest rural areas of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. This critical ecosystem provides water to approximately one million people and supports more than 2,000 plant and animal species that are unique to this area. The catchment is presently under threat due to the degradation of land from overgrazing, the loss of land to water-thirsty invasive vegetation, and vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Rural communities also face significant challenges: unemployment is higher than the national average, with many people dependent upon social grants and the landscape for their livelihoods. The proportion of households with access to piped water inside the home or yard is as low as 16 percent, and waterborne diseases pose a risk to youth and the elderly. In order for conservation to be effectively implemented, the health needs of the community and the proper management of their livestock need to be addressed.

CSA is working in the upper reaches of the uMzimvubu to improve water resources sustainability by applying a “One Health” framework that integrates water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) activities with freshwater conservation, improved livestock farming and restoration efforts. By empowering local communities to manage and benefit from their natural resources, and supporting local governance structures that enable sustainable livelihoods, “One Health” aims secure water futures for all water users. This project draws on work from the USAID-supported Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group—a consortium of seven international conservation NGOs—to develop project implementation guidelines and a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework and indicators to measure the added value of integrated freshwater conservation and WASH programming. CSA’s “One Health” initiative in the uMzimvubu catchment is demonstrating how human well-being, economic growth, and environmental sustainability go hand in hand.

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South Africa

Determining changes in stream health

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Four people kneel and look closely at a dish with stream water inside.
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Copyright © 2019
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Patrick Nease
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October 2016, Conservation South Africa's (CSA) Nolubabalo Kwayimani and Nompendulo "Pesh" Mgwali teach volunteers to perform a stream assessment in order to determine changes and improvements in stream health in the uMzimvubu watershed. The uMzimvubu catchment spans over two million hectares of the poorest rural areas of South Africa’s Eastern Cape Province. This critical ecosystem provides water to approximately one million people and supports more than 2,000 plant and animal species that are unique to this area. The catchment is presently under threat due to the degradation of land from overgrazing, the loss of land to water-thirsty invasive vegetation, and vulnerability to the impacts of climate change. Rural communities also face significant challenges: unemployment is higher than the national average, with many people dependent upon social grants and the landscape for their livelihoods. The proportion of households with access to piped water inside the home or yard is as low as 16 percent, and waterborne diseases pose a risk to youth and the elderly. In order for conservation to be effectively implemented, the health needs of the community and the proper management of their livestock need to be addressed.

CSA is working in the upper reaches of the uMzimvubu to improve water resources sustainability by applying a “One Health” framework that integrates water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) activities with freshwater conservation, improved livestock farming and restoration efforts. By empowering local communities to manage and benefit from their natural resources, and supporting local governance structures that enable sustainable livelihoods, “One Health” aims secure water futures for all water users. This project draws on work from the USAID-supported Africa Biodiversity Collaborative Group—a consortium of seven international conservation NGOs—to develop project implementation guidelines and a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework and indicators to measure the added value of integrated freshwater conservation and WASH programming. CSA’s “One Health” initiative in the uMzimvubu catchment is demonstrating how human well-being, economic growth, and environmental sustainability go hand in hand.

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South Africa

Handpump mechanic meets with a community water committee

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A group of people sit outside, looking toward the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
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Patrick Nease
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July 2018. In Kamuli District, Uganda, a local hand pump mechanic employed by Whave meets with members in a community water committee to discuss their needs and payment for Whave's preventive maintenance services. Whave is a member of the USAID-supported Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership, a consortium of researchers and practitioners identifying solutions to the challenge of developing robust local systems capable of sustaining water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) service delivery. As climate change threatens water supplies and infrastructure in sub-saharan Africa, the need for strengthened local systems that provide reliable water services is critical. Community-managed preventive maintenance is one method to avoid hand pump breakdowns and maintain water source functionality.

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Uganda

Children watching as water infrastructure gets rehabilitated in Kamuli District, Uganda

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Children looking at a the camera with sky behind them.
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Copyright © 2019
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Patrick Nease
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July 2018. In Kamuli District, Uganda, children watch as local hand pump mechanics employed by Whave replace a hand pump with a new electric water pump, which will reduce the time for the community to fill up jerricans. Whave is a member of the USAID-supported Sustainable WASH Systems Learning Partnership, a consortium of researchers and practitioners identifying solutions to the challenge of developing robust local systems capable of sustaining water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) service delivery. As climate change threatens water supplies and infrastructure in sub-saharan Africa, the need for strengthened local systems that provide reliable water services is critical.

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Uganda

The people's river

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A man stands in a field, holding a staff and smiling toward the camera.
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Copyright © 2019
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Bobby Neptune for Winrock International
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Subject: Gordon Mumbo
Location: Mara River, Kenya
Date: July 10, 2018

Gordon Mumbo is team leader for the Sustainable Water Partnership (SWP), USAID’s flagship water program along the Mara River. According to Mumbo, this knowledge-sharing exercise is a two-way street; SWP educates communities on water risk and conservation, while the communities provide invaluable local perspective. It’s not just the atmosphere of transboundary cooperation that sets SWP’s work apart. It’s also the sense of ownership Mumbo and his team are cultivating in the people of the Mara, from community members to government officials to private sector representatives. “The river belongs to the people who live along it,” Mumbo concludes. “They understand the river better than anybody else. They will be able to own it and work with you at sustaining it. If you want to manage the river, you must involve the people.”

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Kenya