A joint development initiative of NASA and USAID, SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries use information provided by Earth-observing satellites and geospatial technologies to manage climate risks and land use.

SERVIR

A joint development initiative of NASA and USAID, SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries use information provided by Earth-observing satellites and geospatial technologies to manage climate risks and land use.  SERVIR empowers decision-makers with tools, products, and services to act locally on climate-sensitive issues such as disasters, agriculture, water, ecosystems, and land use.

 

SERVIR is improving awareness, increasing access to information, and supporting analysis to help people in Amazonia, West Africa, Eastern and Southern Africa, Hindu Kush-Himalaya, and Lower Mekong regions manage food security, water resources, land use change, and natural disasters. With activities in more than 45 countries and counting, SERVIR has already developed over 70 custom tools, collaborated with over 200 institutions, and trained almost 3000 individuals, improving the capacity to develop local solutions.

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At first glance, USAID and NASA seem like an unlikely pair. NASA’s satellites watch the world from above; USAID helps farmers around the world grow crops from the ground up. But through a 15-year partnership, we’re helping solve one of the greatest threats to Earth — the climate crisis — and simultaneously strengthening resilience against poverty, hunger, malnutrition, and lack of access to safe water and sanitation.
In November 2020, two back-to-back category 4 hurricanes, Eta and Iota, struck Central America, making landfall on the coast of Nicaragua, near its border with Honduras, and also affecting El Salvador and Guatemala. Altogether, they caused an estimated one billion US dollars in damage. Despite such impacts, the region was better able to prepare for and respond to Eta and Iota using space-based technologies.
How do we build inclusive spaces when developing geospatial services? How can we ensure that the services developed by SERVIR benefit all of society—particularly the most vulnerable—in the context of a rapidly changing climate?