A joint development initiative of NASA and USAID, SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries use information provided by Earth-observing satellites and geospatial technologies to manage climate risks and land use.

SERVIR

A joint development initiative of NASA and USAID, SERVIR works in partnership with leading regional organizations world-wide to help developing countries use information provided by Earth-observing satellites and geospatial technologies to manage climate risks and land use.  SERVIR empowers decision-makers with tools, products, and services to act locally on climate-sensitive issues such as disasters, agriculture, water, ecosystems, and land use.

 

SERVIR is improving awareness, increasing access to information, and supporting analysis to help people in West Africa, Eastern and Southern Africa, Hindu Kush-Himalaya, and Lower Mekong regions manage food security, water resources, land use change, and natural disasters.  With activities in more than 45 countries and counting, SERVIR has already developed over 70 custom tools, collaborated with over 200 institutions, and trained almost 3000 individuals, improving the capacity to develop local solutions.
 

Visit the official SERVIR website

Image

SERVIR logos

 

Upcoming Events

View All Events about
Women are the primary custodians of natural resources in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region and are at the forefront of the impacts of climate change. Yet, when it comes to decision-making and research on managing these resources, women’s voices are rarely heard.
In 1976, Salvador Dali painted an 99 ¼ inch by 75 ½ inch oil painting he called “Gala Contemplating the Mediterranean Sea which at Twenty Meters Becomes the Portrait of Abraham Lincoln - Homage to Rothko (Second Version)” (Figure 1). When viewed up close, we see the nuanced details of the artist’s work and are likely distracted by the dominant figure that is so clearly in focus.
One of the major challenges in monitoring forests is identifying forest degradation processes. Degradation events can be “small, subtle, and temporary,” making their identification difficult. However, recent years have seen advancements in satellite remote sensing technology, which has in turn revealed changed patterns of illegal deforestation activity in the Amazon rainforest.