Adaptation

USAID has partnered with more than 24 countries to help reduce their vulnerability to weather and climate risks. Through technical assistance, USAID supports countries and communities to build their capacity to independently predict and prepare for climate variability and change so they can effectively deal with associated stresses and minimize losses and disruption. This support helps people sustain their livelihoods and thrive, which promotes stability.

Click here to read about the impacts that USAID adaptation investments have had since 2010.

Features

SERVIR-Global

SERVIR is a joint development initiative of NASA, USAID, premier U.S. research institutions, and leading technical organizations around the world.

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Ecosystem-based Adaptation

Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is a nature-based method for climate change adaptation that can reduce the vulnerability of societies and economies to climate stressors. 

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March marks the onset of the dry and hot season in Thailand. In the region, dry vegetation coupled with small human-made fires often result in uncontrolled forest fires. Agricultural burning and forest fires, including transboundary haze, contribute to high levels of pollution. Forest fires release particulate matter (PM) into the atmosphere including PM2.5 which are microscopic particles with a diameter of 2.5 microns or less – 30 times smaller than the diameter of the human hair.
Climate change and population growth are increasing concerns for global food security. Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have reached record high levels and the world is currently on track to overshoot the targets of the Paris Agreement, heightening the importance of developing technologies to help farmers adapt to climate change. This is especially urgent for the poorest and most vulnerable farmers, who already struggle to produce enough food.
Poor air quality and climate change are major challenges facing Nepal. Air pollution poses the second highest risk factor for death and disability in the country, behind only malnutrition. Meanwhile, scientists predict that Nepal will be especially vulnerable to climate change over the next century, with a projected intensification of droughts, heatwaves, river floods, and glacial lake outburst flooding. In recent years, USAID/Nepal has placed greater emphasis on air quality improvement and is in the process of awarding a multi-sectoral air quality activity, the Kathmandu Valley Clean Air Program (KCAP), to reduce air pollution in the Kathmandu Valley.